School Improvement Plan



CLEARMONT ELEMENTARY SCHOOL






Continuous School Improvement Plan




TITLE I




2013-2014


Meeting Times: First Thursday of each month at 2:35pm.







TABLE OF CONTENTS


Leadership Team Members


SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT TEAM


CHAIRPERSON Dawn Robinson

(Also Title I Chair) Stuart Jolley Principal (Consultant)


CURRICULUM/PLANNING Megan Hobson Chairperson

Heather England


COMMUNICATIONS        Malinda Silver Chairperson

                                                  Kim Ransom


PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Jill Hensley Chairperson

Sarah Harris

CLIMATE Shelly Bailey Chairperson

Heather England


SCHOOL SAFETY Shannon Edge Chairperson

Tina Whitson


PBIS Malinda Silver Chairperson  
Shelly Bailey

Dawn Robinson

Sharleen Wiseman

Jill Hensley

Megan Hobson

Shannon Edge

Stuart Jolley


OLWEUS Jill Hensley Chairperson

Dawn Robinson

Malinda Silver

Stuart Jolley


CARE TEAM CHAIRPERSON  Sharleen Wiseman


TESTING COORDINATOR Dawn Robinson




I.  VISION  

  • Mission

  • Belief Statements

  • Motto


II:  PROFILE

       A.   Student Achievement Outcome Data

         B.   Student, School, and Community Demographic Data

         C.   Instructional and Organizational Effectiveness Data

                Summary

  1. Stakeholders Perceptions Data Summary

  2. Goals and Strategies

  3. Title I Plan


.

Clearmont Elementary Faculty and Staff



Administrative Staff

  • Stuart Jolley, Principal

  • Tammy Hensley, Secretary


Teachers

  • Shelly Bailey, Kindergarten

  • Sharleen Wiseman, First Grade

  • Kim Ransom, Second Grade

  • Dawn Robinson, Second Grade/Media Specialist

  • Jill Hensley, Third Grade

  • Megan Hobson, Fourth Grade

  • Shannon Edge, Fifth Grade


Support Staff

  • Teresa Stiles, Counselor

  • Lynn Honeycutt, Exceptional Children

  • Marcia Huskins, Art

  • Elizabeth Boulter, Music

  • Cody Tipton, P.E.

  • Yvonne Hardin, School Nurse

  • Sharryl Haggerman, Differentiated Curriculum

  • Daniel Hughes, Resource Officer


Teacher Assistants

  • Heather England

  • Sarah Harris

  • Tina Whitson

  • Malinda Silver


Custodial Staff

  • Gene Berry


Food Service Staff

  • Julie Letterman, Manager

  • Pat Brickhouse



Bus Drivers

  • Tina Whitson

  • Nancy Pittman

  • Kathy Honeycutt




I. VISION




I. Beliefs



  1. Beliefs  


  1. All students can learn if given an optimal educational setting.

  2. Students need a classroom environment that encourages active participation and reduces fear of failure, in a safe and caring environment.

  3. Students need to develop their personal literacy to its fullest potential to be successful in a global society.

  4. Support must be provided to all students for social and emotional growth.  

  5. Students must be respectful citizens who value themselves, others and their environment.

  6. Students should have flexible access to the media center and computer lab during the entire school day.

  7. Student learning is enhanced through project based learning activities.

  8. All staff should participate in professional growth activities.

  9. Education is a partnership between the school, home, and community.

  10. All students learn best when learning activities are integrated with media and technology skills.



  1. Mission


At Clearmont School our primary concern is to provide the highest quality education through continual growth among students and faculty. To achieve this growth, we are proactive in researching, developing, and implementing new methods of instruction and delivery, as well as using all available data to drive instructional decision-making.  Our classrooms are interactive, exciting, and BRING LEARNING TO LIFE! for all of our students.



C. Motto

BRINGING LEARNING TO LIFE!





I. PROFILE







Student Achievement Outcome Data

School Profile General Description



Clearmont Elementary is one of six elementary schools in the Yancey County (NC) school district. Built in 1937, it is one of the last original WPA rock school buildings in North Carolina. Its mission is to provide a safe and nurturing environment to empower all students to achieve their full potential as life-long learners and global citizens. With an average elevation of 2,817 feet, Yancey County is the most mountainous county in North Carolina and is 100% rural.


Clearmont School has been the heart of this economically disadvantaged community since 1918. The present building first opened as a 1st – 12th grade school in 1937. Most of the current students represent the 4th generation in their family to receive their education at Clearmont School. We have one class per grade level.   Over fifty-one percent of our students qualify for free or reduced lunch.


Local Government


Based on the 2000 US Census Bureau data, the population of Yancey County is 17, 774.  A three-member Board of Commissioners provides county government.  The county property tax rate is $.50 per $100.00 of assessed valuation.



Employment


The top employer in our county is Yancey County Schools.   Mountain Air Country Club and other industries such as Altec and Glen Raven Mills are leading employers. The unemployment rate was 6.0% in June 2007.  The county’s mountainous terrain has contributed to limited economic development and, like most of Appalachia; Yancey County residents are poor or low income. In 2006, Per capita income in Yancey County was only $21,982, ranking it the 98th lowest out of 100 counties; NC average is $28,092 (US Bureau of Economic Analysis, 2006). Yancey County is classified as a Tier I county, or “severely economically deprived,” (NC Dpt. of Commerce, 2008). Recently, families have suffered from a significant increase in children living in poverty (21.1% in 2000 to 27.9% in 2005, U.S. Census). The NC Department of Commerce classified Yancey County the “4th least able to pay for projects and programs” in the state’s 100 counties.

Analysis of the Documentation Data Revealed the Following:


Outcome Data:  Performance Composite

Performance

Composite

2008-2009

2009-2010

2010- 2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

Reading

88.3

83.3

84.2

75.8


Math

95.3

95

94.7

83.9



Conclusions from Performance Composite Data


*Undetermined at this time.


Outcome Data:  EOG READING Scores

Reading % at levels III & IV

2008-2009

2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

Grade 3

77.2%

77.3%

85.7%

56%

N/A

Grade 4

94.1%

85%

73.7%

93.3%

N/A

Grade 5

94.1%

88.9%

91.7%

86.4%

N/A



Outcome Data: EOG MATH Scores

Math % at

Level III & IV

2008-2009

2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

Grade 3

86.3%

90.9%

85.7%

64%

N/A

Grade 4

100%

95%

94.7%

100%

N/A

Grade 5

100%

100%

100%

95.5%

N/A


Conclusions from School Level EOG READING & MATH Scores


*Undetermined at this time.










                             Conclusion of Testing Data


During the last four years (2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012) Clearmont  made high growth, met AYP standards, and has received Honor School of Excellence status for 2009, 2010, and School of Distinction for 2011 and 2012. Test scores have yet to be released for the 2012-2013 school year, therefore, analysis of those scores can not be completed at this time.  Clearmont Elementary has no true subgroup due to the enrollment number of students at the third, fourth, and fifth testing span.  The school population has remained stable the last three years, with a rise to 127 students this year.  Students receiving free or reduced lunches remain above 50%, with Clearmont remaining a Title I school.


Clearmont NCEOG scores for the past 2009-2011 school years have remained stable, with math in the mid 90% range, and Reading in the high to mid 80% range.  The 2011  test scores rose and fell according to grade level.  Third grade experienced dramatic declines in both reading and math that year, being  attributed to a high number of children with academic disabilities making up the third grade.  Those students are in fifth grade this year, so we have added more support for these students in their academic subjects.  Our EC teacher is implementing inclusion in the form of small reading groups in the classroom, as well as pulling these students out three times a week.  When our tutoring after school begins, this will give  them every opportunity to be successful. In 2011, the  fourth grade made high gains in reading, and math gained 4.7 points to reach 100%.  


In 2011, EVAAS data shows that our fourth grade students scored at state average in Reading and above state average in Math.  Fifth grade students scored above state average in both Reading and Math.  All students showed high growth.   The at-risk students shown in the EVAAS reports will begin in October working with our in-school tutor in Reading and Math.   They will also receive differentiated instruction and will be followed in the RTI Tiers.



B.  Student, School, & Community Demographic Data


SCHOOL COMMUNITY PROFILE


Historical Ethnicity Information (% of population)


Population

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

Female

60

62

60

Male

56

55

67

Black

1

0

0

White

116

117

124

Hispanic

0

0

2

TOTAL

117

117

127


                                                          




Conclusion


Our school population has remained stable, approximately 127.  Black and Hispanic students still make up less than 1 percent of the total student population.



Historical Population Data


Headcount

2010-

2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

Exceptional Children

9(.076)

15(13%)

18 (16%)

AIG

1(.008)

3(.025)

4 (.050)

Free lunch

41%

41%

50%

Reduced

18%

18%

18%

Total free/reduced

59%

59%

68%



Conclusion of Historical Data


The number of students who qualify for the AG program remains at less than 1% of the student population.  The number of students in the EC program has increased to almost double the amount of past years.  The students who qualify for free and reduced lunch remains steady at close to 60%.



ATTENDANCE DATA


2010-2011

97.5

2011-2012

97.8

2012-2013

95.5



Conclusion


School attendance has remained high over past three years.  The implementation of after school make-up and tutoring throughout the year has played a great role in this increase.




STAFFING SUMMARY



2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

Teachers Highly Qualified

100%

100%

100%

100%

Faculty with advanced degrees

(above bachelors)

21%

21%

21%

21%

Teachers with NBC

3

3

3

3

Teachers trained as mentors

2

2

2

2






Teacher Turn Over Rate

12%

12%

15%

15%


Conclusion of Staffing



The faculty is considered highly qualified in accordance with the No Child Left Behind legislation. There are six regular classroom teachers, one itinerate Exceptional Children’s teacher, and one Differentiated Curriculum teacher. Three teachers are National Board Certified and four faculty members hold Master’s Degrees. There are three classroom teacher assistants and one computer lab assistant. Teacher turnover rate at Clearmont has not been significant over the past five years.  We are still using Title I money to fund ½ of a teaching position.



STUDENT RESIDENCY

2012-2013



Both Parents

Single Parent

Grandparents

Foster

Care

Brother

Or Sister

Other

K

16

3

1

0

12


1

12

8

0

0

18


2

14

6

0

0

15


3

10

12

0

0

11


4

11

10

2

0

10


5

10

5

0

0

17


Total

73

44

3

0

83




Conclusion of Residency


The residency of our students is relatively stable.  Sixty-one percent live with both parents.  Thirty-six percent live in a single parent home and less than one percent live either in foster care or with grandparents.  No student has been identified as homeless.



C.  Instructional & Organizational Effectiveness Data



Instructional Effectiveness:


  • Curriculum

  • Instructional Design

  • Assessment


Clearmont Elementary School is accredited by the AdvancEd Accreditation System.  We provide academically rich curricular programs that are aligned with the Common Core and Essential Standards.


Curriculum:

Clearmont Elementary School emphasizes the Common Core and Essential Standards in implementing our core curriculum.  Teachers are fully implementing all areas, as well as using formative assessments to ensure students understanding of all concepts taught.  As a recipient of the North Carolina IMPACT model grant in 2012, we were able to integrate technology into all areas of our core curriculum at a more advanced level.  Our core subject areas consist of English Language Arts, Math, Science, and Social Studies in the classroom, along with Arts, Music, and Physical Education programs delivered by subject area specialist teachers.  We are excited this year to continue enhancing our teaching model, BRINGING LEARNING TO LIFE!  Teachers present a project-based, interdisciplinary method of learning, which is followed by a field experience, and a chance for students to apply their knowledge.  We have adopted this methodology school wide, and feel that it is an effective method of instructional delivery.

Benchmark and summative assessments measure skills taught over a period of time, and inform teachers which students are at-risk and need to be remediated.   Our countywide Four-Block Literacy Program is used daily to enhance each area of the Language Arts program incorporating on a daily basis the different approaches to beginning reading. The Four-Block Guided Reading, Self Selected Reading, Writing, and Working with Words represent four different approaches to teaching children to read and write effectively.  Reading instruction will use both literature and informational text in the form of new novel and book sets, magazines, etc…  Clearmont teachers emphasize small group activities, using art to teach literature, shared inquiry, and making connections to the real world through instruction.  Language is encouraged and developed by presentations and multimedia products.  

Our Mathematics program is highly integrated into the other subject areas by using technology to prepare graphs charts and provide visual connections to mathematical concepts.  A strong emphasis is placed on building a solid understanding of number facts, the computational process and operations concepts, developing problem solving skills, and constant review of the basic math skills.  

Our Science and Social Studies Essential Standards are also highly supported by our access to new technologies.  Starboards and visual presenters along with internet resources allow for classrooms to be interactive and more student-led in investigating ideas emphasizing concepts.  The supporting technology aids our teachers in addressing different learning styles. The countywide AIMS program is a resource used by each teacher to further supplement the science program.

This year, professional development will continue to focus on all teachers becoming proficient in the implementation of the Homebase PowerSchool format.


Instructional Design:


Clearmont students are not seen as being as culturally diverse as students in other schools; however, they are diverse in their learning styles.   The Clearmont faculty seeks to improve student learning and meet individual students’ needs through a variety of instructional methods.  Students participate in both small and whole group instruction. They work together in cooperative groups, and as peer tutors.  The use of math manipulatives and inquiry science investigations allows students to develop math and science skills that build a concrete learning foundation. Use of technology equipment in the classroom has allowed teachers to present instruction to students with all learning styles.  Students take pretests in specific subject matter and this information allows teachers to place each student at his/her personal learning level.  The computer programs allow teachers to generate lessons specifically for each student whether the student is an exceptional needs student or one served in the differentiated instructional program.  

Students participate in after school remediation and enrichment activities presented through computer-assisted instruction and small-group instruction. Community agencies, such as Yancey County Literacy Council and the local 4-H program, help to facilitate learning through programs provided to students at the school.   

We have revised our tutoring program to provide work on skills for our at-risk students (students who scored a I, II, or borderline III), beginning after the Winter Break.  We use EVASS data to determine which students are at-risk, as well as disaggregating our own data to determine which students passed with only a borderline score.  Beginning in February, the 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade teachers will offer tutoring after school for at-risk students.  


Communication is an area of strength found at Clearmont Elementary.  Examples of communication methods include: a school newsletter to parents, internal memos, Connect5 Calling System, faculty meetings, regular letters home to parents, announcements on the school’s sign, and updated teacher web pages.  These provide a wide-range of verbal and written forms of communication within the school and between school and home.


Educational Agenda:


Clearmont School serves as the educational hub for the surrounding community.  The faculty and staff presently serve fourth generation students from local families.  Though family structure has changed somewhat and the building has undergone renovations, the school’s vision remains the same.  The faculty still values the basic belief that all students can learn when they are placed in a safe and nurturing environment.  This underlying goal drives our beliefs, goals, and mission of our educational setting as we seek excellence for all our students.  As we have moved into the twenty-first century, we have new challenges that we strive to meet.  Our society has become a global one through the advancement of technology.  The school’s staff has embraced this challenge as we prepare our students for success in a global community.       


The organizational structure of Clearmont Elementary includes one administrator, one secretary, 6 teachers, 4 teacher assistants, two members of the support staff, one custodian, two food service staff members, and three bus drivers.    Our students’ school day begins at 7:45 a.m. and ends at 2:20 pm.  Teachers’ school day is 7:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.  Students are scheduled with one grade-level teacher for the entire school day.  One teacher assistant is scheduled for each grade level classroom from Kindergarten through 1st Grades.  Other grades share a  ½ teacher assistant each.  We offer regular classroom instruction in core subjects, Physical Education, Music, and Art.  Like academic subjects, Physical Education is a full-year course.  Music and Art are offered for one-half year each.  There is one Exceptional Children’s’ teacher who is here for four days a week.


Culture of Continuous Improvement :


Clearmont faculty and staff seek ways to continually improve the learning environment for our students.  We have working school improvement committees that play an important role in all aspects of the school.  As the Principal is the Instructional Leader for the school, he is proactive in seeking out the best research-based development appropriate for all teachers/grades, and budgets for these opportunities.  The staff also meets at grade level meetings with teachers from across the school district.  Teachers take advantage of attending workshops and participate in trainings to stay informed of current trends in education.

Our BRINGING LEARNING TO LIFE! motto, is a project-based, interdisciplinary program of learning, which is followed by a field experience, and a chance for students to apply their knowledge.  This method is being used in all content areas.  

Testing data is reviewed yearly and goal summaries are compared to previous years so that adjustments may be made in instructional presentation.  An important tool used to evaluate testing data is EVAAS, a program that generates reports that show students whom are at-risk for failing the present year’s testing, teacher value to students’ performance, etc…  Teachers and the administration seek resources that target any weakness that may be identified during the data analysis process.  


Community-Building:


The Clearmont School building and school grounds have served the Clearmont School Community for almost seventy years.  Many different strategies are used to increase communication efforts between school, home, and the community.  For example:   teachers’ web pages, Connect5 Call system, a monthly letter to parents, local newspaper articles, PTO meetings, K-2 weekly behavior reports,  and our Parent Advisory Committee.


Limitations


All schools across our state have had to tighten their budgets, and an area that has affected our school this year is losing funding for our in-school tutor.  All of our teachers in the tested grades really depended on this extra personnel helping their students during pull-out sessions as well as inclusion, and we hope it does not impact our test scores for this school-year.



Conclusion


Based on our analysis of instructional and organizational effectiveness, we identified our strengths and areas needing improvement.  We plan to build on our strengths and address our limitations.  



III. PLAN





Clearmont Elementary School’s Continuous Improvement Plan

SBE Goal 1:  NC public schools will produce globally competitive students.

District Goal 1.1: Implement Common Core and Essential Standards K-12

School Goal 1.1.1: Clearmont School will implement Common Core English/Language Arts and Math Standards.                                                                                                                                                                                


SBE Goal 2:  Leadership will guide innovation in NC public schools.

District Goal 2.2:  Explore/provide Common Core and Essential Standards professional development opportunities for all staff

District Goal 2.7:  Explore and develop consistent and deliberate instructional strategies to enhance Common Core and Essential Standards implementation

Data Teams in each school to promote data analysis, Classroom Visit Document

Classroom Checklist Document, Lesson Plan, Instructional Design


School Goal 2.31, 2.7.1: Clearmont will collect, analyze, and use all available data to drive school improvement and instruction.

School Goal  2.4.1:  Clearmont will incorporate all AdvancEd goals into our School Improvement Plan.

School Goal  2.7.1:  Clearmont will continue to develop instructional strategies to enhance Common Core and Essential Standards.  


SBE Goal 3: NC public schools will be governed and supported by 21st Century systems.

District Goal 3.3:  Train staff in 21st Century Systems (dependent on funding)

District Goal 2.4: Train staff in Homebase acquisitions and procedures.

School Goal  3.2.1: Clearmont will collect, analyze, and use all available data to drive school improvement and instruction.


SBE Goal 1:  NC public schools will produce globally competitive students.

District Goal 1.1: Implement Common Core and Essential Standards K-12


School Goal 1.1.1: Clearmont School will implement Common Core English/Language Arts Standards and raise EOG reading scores by at least 5%.                                                                                                                                                                                


SBE Goal 1:  NC public schools will produce globally competitive students.

District Goal 1.1: Implement Common Core and Essential Standards K-12


School Goal 1.1.2: Clearmont School will implement Common Core Math Standards and raise EOG math scores by 5%.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 



Clearmont Elementary School’s

Professional Development Plan




Professional Development Plan

Professional development continues to be a priority at Clearmont School.  Request for professional development comes from professional and personal growth documented by the individual teacher in his/her Professional Development Plan for Career Teachers (PDP) , the School Improvement and Title I Plans.  The school follows the county requirements for all professional development by completing professional development request and evaluation forms.  Money at the school is allotted by individual teacher needs and must have a direct correlation to high student performance or the emotional/physical needs of the students.  Strong emphasis is placed on professional development that addresses literacy and math.

We include the entire school community in professional development planning and activities.  Data is gathered from our Teacher and Community Needs Assessment Surveys as well as EOG Scores, student data management reports to decide what workshops, conferences and program trainings the staff needs. The Principal and the Staff Development committee will review this data to develop a comprehensive professional development plan for the school year.  This plan is constantly being reviewed and updated based on teacher needs and requests.

Staff development is also a major component of Clearmont’s School Improvement Plan. The staff development committee works with the Principal to establish the professional development schedules for our staff. The core of this committee is the principal and three staff members made up of a team of 1 paraprofessional and 2 certified personnel members. The group gathers information on teacher and student needs through several means. However, all of our professional development originates from the school improvement plan and PDP’s.  It continues to focus on our school-wide goals (Continued implementation of the Ron Clark Model:  BRINGING LEARNING TO LIFE! and our roll-out of our Positive Behavior Intervention Support program), and other goals developed by the teacher and approved by the administrator.

After determining needs, the staff development committee then takes responsibility to organize and schedule the professional development that will fit the needs of the Clearmont teachers.



CLEARMONT ELEMENTARY

2013-2014

Staff Development Activity

Support Data and Identified Need

Resources for Activity

Type of Training

Evaluation Method

Staff Responsible

Grade Level Meetings

CCore

Essential Standards

SIP

Local Funds

Workshops

Curriculum Specialist

Ability to implement in the classroom

(Curriculum Specialist)

Classroom Teachers

WRESA when appropriate

CCore

Essential Standards

SIP

Title I Funding

Workshop

Curriculum Specialist (Region)

EOG Scores

Classroom teachers

Curriculum Specialist (Region)

Principal

Math Conference Greensboro

Common Core

CCore

Essential Standards

SIP

Local funds

Workshop by

DPI Consultants

EOG Scores

Attendance log for documentation

Classroom teachers

Curriculum Specialist

Principals